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Philips and its CD-i entertainment system pulled off a major coup this month by securing the rights from Nintendo to release new Zelda titles.

Unfortunately, these were far removed from the quality of the Nintendo-produced Legend Of Zelda titles, with Animation Magic managing to create games lacking in both magic and animation.

The gaming press thought the decision to grant a licence to produce CD-based games using one of the most recognisable franchises peculiar, considering that Nintendo was reportedly getting closer to the launch of its own CD-based add-on for the SNES.

Did it know something the rest of us didn't? A great game in single-player but magnificent with four players. She's been ripped from the Castlevania lore as the first Belmont to not only become a lead character but also the first female Belmont as well.

She was supposed to make her debut in Castlevania Resurrection for the Sega Dreamcasf, only to have her hopes and digital dreams nailed back into the coffin.

All we have as proof of the female vampire killer is her starring role in Castlevania Legends for the Game Boy. The year is , and we journey to the land of Transylvania.

In legends,, Sonia joins forces with a non-playable son of Dracula, Alucard, to defeat the lord of darkness. Though there is romantic tension between the two, there is fierce rivalry as well.

Eventually, Sonia defeats Dracula, and swears to raise her family to fight the vampire king in an eternal struggle between good and evil.

The cruelest evil, however, is the fact that the series takes a step backwards with this rendition. The last of the original Game Boy trilogy, this release is plagued with problems that not even the strongest of weapons can cure.

Sonia is brutally slow in this game, right on par with Christopher in Castlevania: The Adventure. The magic system introduced offers Sonia five soul weapons to use throughout her adventure.

Bosses are the atypical for Dracula's partners in crime. Medusa, Minotaur, Death,. Even fighting Alucard is a treat.

Boss battles feel too easy at times, and the level layouts to get to these enemies feel a bit off balance and not varied enough. While the tracks on Belmont's Revenge were much more memorable, legends has some excellent classic Castlevania tunes, and they are better than Adventure's by a long shot.

The tracks use quick arpeggios and harpsichord melodies, and oozes with the familiar songs to match the atmosphere of the experience.

Despite Sonia not getting a fair shot at glory. Legends is worth checking out. It soars for high prices on auction websites, but is a decent addition to your Game Boy library.

Just be su re to pick up Belmont's Revenge first. W Attention is also drawn to a lustrous cloth mural that hangs on the wall A gift from Nintendo, it's an unusual mf totem to watch over the studio and remind visitors of the strong connection that both companies share.

Retro Gamer: Thanks for giving up your time to speak to us. Can you tell us a little about what Rare was like when you first joined the company?

Brendan Gunn: It really was a small family company. You'd know absolutely everyone. BG; Yes. Carole Stamped came in and brought us some coffee, so yeah r it reatiy was a small sort of family- run business.

Nick Burton: It was still like that, actually, when I had my interview. Chris interviewed me. George Andreas: I think that was one of the reasons I was really attached to the company when 1 came in.

Like Brendan said, there was definitely a family feel to the whole place. Everyone knew everyone, and there weren't many people there at the beginning.

But I had Tim doing my interview and it just felt like a home. Rare was actually originally based in their old home as well, just up the road in an old farmhouse.

The rooms were converted into development areas and it definitely felt like a home. It's not quite like that today; Rare is part of a much bigger machine now, I Can you tell us about Tim and Chris?

What were they like as individuals and bosses? BG: Really strong individuals. Tim, especially, I think really felt like a boss, you were always a little wary of him.

But no r they were really great, clever people and really good to work with. When I started we didn't have designers as such. Each team was really small, and Tim would come up with a lot of the game ideas and pass them on to the programmers.

Back then each team would consist of a programmer and half an artist - you'd share an artist between two projects - and then there was a single musician for the whole company.

GA: For me, Tim was the creative flair. That's not to say Chris didn't have any creative ability at all. I think. So the two of them together were obviously brothers and could work together very well.

There was a little bit of friction between them from time to time, but that was good - it promoted a good spirit amongst themselves and good results.

Of all the people! J ve worked with over the years, and of all the people Lve met I would say that Tim was one of the only people verging on visionary.

He could kind of see things years in advance, and was an amazing artist as well. He could draw with his eyes closed almost and to a very high standard.

In fact, he did some of the graphics for DKC himself, for the first level I think it was. They worked very well together.

Professionally they offset each other with their ability. R i: When it came to game development, how hands-on were Tim and Chris? And how did their involvement change as the company grew?

SG: As I said, Tim used to pretty much design the games to a large extent. A slick game with a variety of courses and racing types, it showed even then how talented the studio was in getting the most out of the NES.

An isometric racer themed around radio-controlled cars, it was one of the first games to ever mix racing and combat together.

As you. Mote the Dinosaur Vianet statuette hUUnj behind the tar cabinet, which shows the fames orifnal hero, Sabre, sat atop a dinosaur.

Tim put this plane on a little stand and kept rotating it through the different angles and sketching it on these bits of tracing paper. He actually did every frame of that himself.

So yes, he was very much hands-on. Sadly, having done all of that r we realised we couldn't fit it all into the cartridge, and so much of that had to be cut.

GA; Even if he hadn't seen you for days, Tim always had this knack of being able to come into your room, look at what you were working on, and within five minutes suggest one or two things that would completely transform your thinking, and suddenly inject just another element to the idea that you wouldn't have thought of yourself.

He had this way of being able to pinpoint a way to make something really good, and he also had a fantastic ability to be able to draw something in a way so that anyone could understand it.

He could get his ideas across with very simple sketches. RG: Do you keep in touch with Tim and Chris, and have they offered their thoughts about how Rare has evolved following their departure?

GA: Since they've left l think they've gone, to be honest. We still bump into them from time to time, They still visit the place where they used to be, so we still see them driving past from time to time, and you wonder, 'What are they doing today?

I've heard all sorts of crazy stories, but not having spoken to them myself.. BG: I actually just spoke to Chris a few weeks ago and he asked how things are going.

He said he was looking forward to seeing what we were working on, but didn't offer any views on what we've done.

He's obviously happy to leave it in his past. RG: Did you notice a big change internally at Rare after they left? GA: They kind of left at a time when things had been running on their own anyway.

Obviously there were many people who were close to Tim and Chris. Some people had long friendships with them. They were as much good friends as they were work colleagues, so I think the thing that those people missed was that daily contact: being able to pick up the phone and speak to them whenever they wanted, and get some encouragement or some advice.

BG It was a bit more of a gradual evolution. The company had changed and they withdrew from being involved in the actual games to the more business side of things, so when they left it barely made any difference with it being such a gradual process, NB: I think for a lot of people who enter this business, you enter it to make games, and then if they develop away from making games they find themselves doing something they don't necessarily want to do.

Packed with variety, missions didn't just see you racing to the finish line bul also saving swimmers, target shooting and even battling giant sea serpents.

BG: Obviously we've talked about how creative Tim was, but then we can't forget how brilliant Chris was with the electronics side of things.

If you wanted a graphics editor to create stuff for games, most people would get a basic PC with some software on it, but Chris had been designing some arcade board, which he then decided he would turn into a little unit that was going to be for running graphics editing software.

I also remember I had a very odd crash bug. I can't remember which game it was now, but I'd spent ages trying to track this bug down and was sure it had to be a software thing.

That was until Chris and Tim came round to see if it had been finished, and Chris just knew somehow. He licked his finger, touched a bit at the back of the cartridge and said, 1 bet it won't crash now.

BG; Each team was small, so it didn't take a lot of people to get a few games going at any one time. So yes, we did have an awful lot on the go.

But we wouldn't be too involved with what the other games were. Even though you were there with people in the same office, you wouldn't spend very long looking at each other's games because it was almost discouraged, to the point that, later on, when the teams grew, we would be in separate barns at the old place and the doors would be locked.

To be honest, we knew very little about what the other games were before they came out. It's a dancing, singing poo! What's that all about?

I wonder what's going on in that barn? You would hear on the grapevine that this team is doing such and such, and there was always that kind of competitiveness, with some people wanting to try to subliminally outdo the other teams.

RG: That's surprising. Is it still like that today? IMB: People are more mobile now, in that they would move between teams much more than they would have done back in that era, so that tends to kill some of that.

Now you'll get someone who will move onto a new team and then suddenly a load of new graphical effects will appear in a game because they've done those for previous products and have brought them with them.

Can you tell us a little about the development process at Rare and how it's changed? Gregg Mayles: At the beginning you had such short time periods for those games that you just tended to get going.

There was never really a grand master plan; you'd have a think about it for a bit and then literally you would start on it and that's probably as far as the planning went in those days.

Even if you got one screenshot or one drawing, that would probably be enough for us to then say, 'Okay, we could do something with that', or, 'That sounds like a good idea.

Let's do something with it. That pond is actually howac to a jiawt octopus called Charles. The plot was mental but the game ludicrously addictive, particularly in two-player.

If it didn't work, it was literally a few hours' work; nowadays you couldn't do that Well, you could, but you'd soon get chaos. It takes a lot longer to go from an idea to being able to see it and play it, so you have to be a lot more focused on trying to think through all the problems before they happen, BG: Certainly from a programming point of view, you'd have an idea based on what you'd seen in this other game, and try to incorporate a bit of that.

It was such a quick process making games back then. Because it was one programmer, you could just go off and do any part at any time, and just start making something interesting.

GA: It also depended on the game we were doing, ft was a mix of licensed and original games back then, and obviously all the licensed stuff had to be finished by a certain date, so you couldn't spend weeks experimenting with wild ideas.

Assuming the role of the crazed ghost Beetlejuice, players embarked an a mission to save his kidnapped pal. With all the trappings of typical Nineties licensed platformers, it's nothing special.

Battletoads, who would come up with those? GA: Well, most of them came from Tim Stamper. Certainly both of those two did.

He used to work very closely with Mark Betteridge. Mark would do the software and Tim would draw the graphics. Tim pretty much came up with most of the ideas.

I'm not sure where the idea for Snake Hattie N Roll came from, though. Perhaps that was how the idea came about? That actually was one of the very first games I tested when I worked for the company.

I played it in the arcades but never got to grips with the trackball controls. I thought the way [Mark] got it to work on the D-pad was brilliant.

It felt really responsive. BG: Actually, 1 think where the IP came from was Mark's idea of how we could get a game onto the smallest capacity cartridge possible, and he came up with this idea of how to do the backgrounds very cheaply, with limited storage.

Then, having done this quite simplistic background style, he thought about how we could get something to move around on it, and it just evolved into a snake It was quite common back then for things to get IP attached to them after we had the game idea.

Nowadays things are quite different. The results of such a marriage should have resulted in a legendary chapter in the book of beat-'em-ups.

Sadly,, failing to live up to its potential, it remains more curio than cLassie among Rare and genre fans, coin-op.! We actually got most of the first level done, and i don't know if this was because the coin-op wasn't a massive success or what, but they just canned it there.

But it was well under way on the SMES, GIVI : [ remember working on the coin-op version for quite a long time and it being finished for ages and not being released, I think Electronic Arts picked it up eventually, I remember it was tested in arcades and it tested pretty well.

Obviously, it was tested on how much money it made, and it did reasonably well. We could never really understand why it wasn't more successful than it was, RG: What was your working relationship with Nintendo like, and how did it come about?

There had been no Western developer for the console up until that point, so they politely said thanks but no. So Chris reverse-engineered the NES hardware to find out how it all worked.

I think we basically put a game together, which was Slalom , and then went back to Nintendo with this game. I think they were so impressed that we had gone to the effort of reverse-engineering and then building a game for their console that Rare became the first Western developer for the NES.

GIVI: Quite possibly, A few years ago, though we never actually started any work on it, we did have a think about if we were going to do a new Batfletoads game, what would we do?

Literally, a few days' work and it never went any further, ft wasn't particularly dear what it could be rather than what it used to be, I mean, weVe seen the Turtles try to reinvent themselves a couple of years ago and that sort of fell flat on its face, r i: Perhaps you could look to the XLBA route.

We'd have to keep the old difficulty level, of course. Maybe we could release it as pay-to-play - we'd only have to do one level and you're not allowed to buy the next level until you've finished the last one.

It just makes it difficult. Like Gregg says, though, never say never. RG: How often would you speak with Nintendo during your first-party relationship?

GM: We didn't visit Nintendo as often as you might think. They were extremely hands-off. I guess they wanted you to sink or swim, so they treated us not too dissimilar to any of their teams, I guess, where they expected a lot of us and we did our best to deliver and they'd always pass feedback back to our games when they were close to being finished.

Nine times out of ten it was spot-on; the comments that were coming in were very good, I mean r with any game you always get a bunch of comments at the end from every man and his dog, and you have to be extremely careful at analysing which ones will actually make the game better.

But Nintendo were extremely focused at coming up with relevant comments. We'd gone to E3 with Dinosaur Planet an d it was kind of obvious anyway, thinking about it after the fact, but the first thing Miyamoto] said to us was, 'Why isn't that Star Fox?

GM: They never enforced a single decision; they just had a habit of making it sound better than your idea.

They'd suggest something and we'd be savvy enough to pick up on the ones they wanted and disregard the ones that we thought maybe they didn't think so strongly about.

They were very subtle about that, especially Miyamoto. He'd kind of suggest something then leave it at that, and then.

GA: Or if you didn't put it in, the next time he'd suggest it again, GM: It was a very good way, but 1 don't think they ever said, "You must do this, you must do that' EG: I remember Miyamoto sending lots of sketches for Donkey Kong when we were doing Donkey Kong Country.

He had very definite thoughts about the way Donkey Kong himself should look, and Tim had obviously designed and rendered all of these images of Donkey Kong.

Miyamoto had very distinct ideas about little aspects of it. They got incorporated, but leaving Rare to leave a little stamp on the character.

GM: He was admirably hands-off, actually. If that would have been my character, I would have been looking into it every day.

GM: There were plans for Rare to become more of a publisher, backed by Nintendo. We were still doing games exclusively for Nintendo, but we were to bear more of the costs of developing them, but then, obviously as a publisher, we would make more out of it.

It also demonstrated how strong Rare and Nintendo's relationship had become over the years, given that Nintendo would entrust the studio with one of its oldest IPs.

It delivered not only a thoroughly good Bond videogame but proved that the elaborate nature of first-person shooters could work on consoles.

A true milestone in console gaming, the impact of GoldenEye is still felt today. Never reaching our shores, Ken Gnjfey wa s, u n t i l Kinect Sports, the last sports game Rare had produced.

The game featured 28 Major League teams, various game modes to delight baseball fans, and staggeringly realistic visuals too, In fact, were not even fans of the sport and we still found it good fun.

Format: N64 r G Do you have any amusing anecdotes about Nintendo that you coufd share with us? It was all as he would expect it to be; swinging on ropes, collecting bananas, jumping into barrels, and we were displaying it on this massive screen downstairs in the old motion capture area.

Anyway, everything was fine, it was exactly as he expected, and then Donkey Kong pulled out a gun. But it wasn't as it turned out to be, which was a coconut gun - it was a real gun with a metal barrel, and Miyamoto's face just kind of dropped.

Blast Corps was a genius idea: the player must use a wide array of demolition vehicles, including two giant mechanised robot suits, to clear a safe route for a computerised truck carrying two unstable nuclear warheads to a safe zone.

A great 3D update of nail-biling reaction games like Loco-Motion. Were desperate to see a sequel. Typical of Rare, the game was piled with characters, options and moves.

So just think: customisable Ultra Comhos, gruesome finishing moves, and glorious HD visuals. The possibilities are awesome. He then had one of his little suggestions for us later on, which was could we turn it into an organic gun.

MB: want to hear about Diddy Kong being dressed up in that rubber suit, with squeaky noises, GA: 3 think Brendan was having some fun one day.

GA: Yeah, I had a go on it at E3 myself and thought they'd done a pretty good job on it, actually. It's looking good. BG; I'm just waiting to see if they've got as many layers of parallax as I put into the game.

You'd always get Tim coming back saying, Tm sure you can get a few more layers in there r r and 'Can we have 27 different layers of rain?

RG: So what was that period like at Rare when your relationship with Nintendo ended? GIVI: A lot of the time when you were working on the games you weren't privy to what was going on in the boardroom, so I guess a lot of people were quite surprised that we weren't with Nintendo any more.

I think it came down to some clause that had to be exercised within a certain amount of time, I think they had to buy the remaining shares in the company or literally say no.

So they were kind of put on the spot at a certain time, decided not to, and that was literally where it ended.

There was no gradual breakdown of relationships or anything like that. GA: We were working on several titles for the GameCube at the time and we obviously showcased some of these titles the first time the GameCube was shown to the public at E3.

A lot of those games then migrated over to the Xbox. From a developer's perspective, it was just business as usual: you were working on games, making products and still working on the GameCube, even though we heard that the relationship could be coming to an end.

It would most likely be impossibly hard, but we wouldn't care. There were obviously discussions going on in the backrooms between Rare and a handful of interested parties in terms of being owned by these companies, and until we knew exactly what was going to happen we just carried on.

I mean, for all we knew we could have been acquired by a multiformat company and could have just carried on working on the GameCube software, so it didn't really affect development in any way, shape or form.

BG: There's certainly nothing new about working on a game that isn't going to come to completion. We've all worked on games that have got canned for various different reasons, MB; It happens all the time.

Generally whatever you were working on - as if you'd transferred over to another team - gets carried across with you and starts to appear in another project in some form.

Certainly, from a programming point of view, a lot of the code is transferable, GA: And from a creative point of view, it's really cool because you're constantly learning all the time in the job anyway, and you can constantly learn new things and new techniques, so you're still on the cusp of everything regardless of what format you're on.

I think that's probably the speciality of the company over the years, I think Rare has really specialised in being able to turn its hand to new hardware and technology.

Its also been a signature of the company, as well as the games. Just imagine drawing objects in thin air, and then seeing them get filled with colourand detail in front of youreyes.

It all sounds like perfect motion-controlled party fodder to us. Rare has been seen to have an air of secrecy surrounding it.

Do you think this has always worked in its favour, and how has that changed over the last ten years? GA: That is almost the legacy of what people remember the company as.

The last five years or so I don't think we've been as secretive. We've done a lot more press things and turned up at shows and talked to the public.

But back in the day I don't think Chris and Tim enpyed being in the limelight. They just wanted to make the games, and let them talk for themselves.

GUI: Any time spent not making the games is obviously time wasted. But even away from work they were incredibly private people and so I think the company just reflected them as individuals.

It had its good points and bad points. It's quite nice being secretive but then, on the other hand, you want to tell people sometimes what you are doing and how you did it, NB: We can still be very secretive when we need to be.

I mean a good example would be Kinect, We've been working on it for two years but nobody knew we were until about Christmas last year.

Even some parts of the studio didn't know what we were doing, as we had to be so secretive about it because with a hardware launch like that you've got to keep things close to your chest.

But with the games, and the products, you can't really do that nowadays, GM: I do think some degree of secrecy is a good thing because a product can get so overexposed that you know every single thing about that product before it comes out.

Then, when you play it, it's exactly like what you expected. I still personally like to find a game that you haven't heard about, you play it and you're like, 'Wow!

Where did that come from? GM: I think we're going to get that with Kinect Sports , We have talked about it quite a lot; I just wonder if people believe what we're saying.

I think when people actually play it they'll be extremely surprised and hopefully delighted. Then again, taking the open-ended, gradually unfurling platform gameplay of Mario 64, and imparting it with the visual style and animal themes of DKC, was always going to be a perfect recipe for a mega hit on the N Can you tell us more about some of your cancelled games and your migrated GatneCube projects?

They obviously [migrated to the! GameCube but were started on the N GA: So if we take Kameo as an example, we were working on the GameCube and then, after we were going to be acquired by Microsoft, we had to convert everything over from the GameCube to the Xbox, which took one, possibly two, engineers somewhere in the region of two weeks to do.

But it gave us an opportunity, I guess, to kind of push the content further and evolve the idea a little bit more.

We had more time to work on certain aspects of the game, so it was probably the best thing to do in the long run. GM : Ghoufies was a less rocky road.

We did a bit of work on a GameCube version and then over to the Xbox, and then literally I think Vc we put our foot down.

This is what we can do. We'd just been acquired by Microsoft; we wanted to produce something as quickly as we could and have a game that probably wouldn't be developed by other developers.

And so we probably could have done with a little bit more development time. GM: No, Ghoufies is a weird one. It was the name that came first. We thought, 'Wouldn't that be a great name for a game?

Some of the guys who A f were working on that walked out r i' i J I was unfamiliar with the code, but got that done as we were " contracted to get it finished, but it was never published.

RC i: So what happened? BG: I actually have no idea. Carrying alt those classic Rare hallmarks on its sleeve, it's a massive, diverse and slick adventure, and one of the studio's most under-appreciated gems.

In many ways, Perfect Dork was the better game, its futuristic setting allowing Rare to use its creativity to the fullest and come up with a great sci-fi story and even better gadgetry and weapons.

In fact, in some ways it will probably aid the process, MB: I think a good example of that was Kameo. There were things you [Georgel wanted to do on the GameCube that we couldn't, and we thought we might be able to on the Xbox, and then the came along and we could definitely do it.

So even though it had steered an unusual path, you ended up with something of greater spectacle than when it was first envisaged. RG: Can you ever see the studio returning to the first- person shooter and racing genres?

Or maybe even some of your early classic franchises? GM: There are only so many genres in games, and the whole industry goes in cycles anyway.

I was trying to get hold of a copy for myself. GA: It's not the first time it's happened in the company, though.

It's not uncommon. For whatever reasons, be it publishing deals or backroom discussions, certain games may not see the light of day even though they are finished products.

GA: It may have been something to do with Killer Instinct Gold, which was coming out on the N64 and to be released shortly after.

From Nintendo's perspective, it may have been that they thought, 'We've got this new game, so we're going to try to promote this new platform and maybe those fans would follow Killer instinct onto the N GA: It depends how long that process Is, If it's three or four years then you're still in the realms of being relevant - that's the important thing.

A good concept is always a good concept: it's just the execution of that concept and how well that's done. But that soon changes onteyou play the game and discover that it's loaded with lewd humour.

Format: GameCube Originally an N64 project titled Dinosaur Planet it eventually migrated to the GameCube and got a foxy re-skin after Miyamoto saw the game running and remarked on its strong similarities with Star Fox.

Diluting the series 1 space combat with adventure akin to Ocarina Of Time w Star Fax Adventures was a departure from previous instalments.

If I was supposed to be one of these people who predict these kinds of trends, and you'd said to me to say that we'd be here, that Kinect Sports would be in manufacture now and about to hit the shelves two years from that date, I wouldn't have second-guessed it at all, GIVI: I mean r we haven r t done a sports title since Ken Griffey Jr's Winning Run on the Super Nintendo, and that was a baseball game, of all things - a sport we knew nothing about.

GA: The other great thing about Kinect is that it could almost re invigorate a lot of old concepts or old ideas, whether you're talking about fighting games or shooting games.

For us. It's just whether we can come up with a decent concept and execute it well enough, BG: I've always wanted to do a racing game, I got to spend two weeks working on a prototype racing game for the Xbox.

It was code named Banjo-Kazoomie, and it was a kind of kart racer, but you constructed the karts out of different parts, so I guess it was kind of a precursor to Nuts St Bolts.

But for those two weeks 1 was doing the driving mechanics for it, GIVI i We had a coin-up for a while, didn't we?

Mark I Betteridgel was working on a racing game. Can you remember? It was a long time ago now. The working name was Rails-Ouf as in flat-out.

I [everybody laughs 1: They were definitely doing this prototype for an arcade racing game. And it was on our own custom arcade hardware, and I think that was the last game we ever tried on arcade.

I think the arcades were dying a death at that point, so we switched focus purely to the console stuff again, G : So tell us about your relationship with Microsoft.

How does it compare to Nintendo? GA: 1 think initially when we started working with Microsoft, it was very much a case of hands-off, letting us do our own thing, and we did, 1 guess.

But we were kind of aimed at a very different demographic, but our priority as a first-party developer, and one of the reasons why they acquired the studio, was to try to create games that other companies wouldn't be looking at creating.

So we were looking at trying to broaden the demographic on the Xbox , And we did our thing, which is what we've always done in the past. I think over the last three years I'd say they've probably become a little bit more involved.

NB: But that's as the business has changed and we've got more involved with them. We've certainly never been as involved in a platform, and that has brought us together in that way but also I think all developers have to be much more mindful now of the kind of market their games are going into.

GA: We are a tot more communicative with Microsoft than vve were with Nintendo. But I think that might be more a reflection of where the industry is today not necessarily our relationship with Microsoft.

MB: f think you would have seen this across all of Microsoft game studios over the last few years. A growth in the relationships between af!

We work on stuff with Lionhead Studios, with Good Science, Big Park; I wouldn't say it makes life easier, but certainly when you're doing something like a hardware launch you want to be able to be on the phone five minutes after you've figured out how to do something, telling your compatriots how to do it as well.

GA: They have amazing resources at Microsoft as well. I think if you took all the games we've made in the past 15 years and added up the amount of user research we did r I think Sports would be ten times that total.

MB: And that's something where we literally go off to that team, explain why we need it, and they make it happen. We have to be very involved to make it happen.

But yeah, Kinect Sports wouldn't be what it is without that. GA: Generally what we do as well, and Sports was a good example, is we came up with three or four different examples for Kinect at the time, and then Microsoft picked which one they thought would then fit into their bigger strategy, what gaps they had in their portfolio, and together we made the decision really, MB: But on the flip side of that, Sports is ours.

What Sports looks like is down to us r but the fact that it is Sports, to a large extent is down to Microsoft. We're just closer.

We wouldn't have any problem being on the phone to different groups every day if we needed to, whereas with Nintendo we probably wouldn't have done that I mean, it's difficult for me to say because I was a rank-and-file programmer back in those days.

I was head down just writing Al routines, but it certainly feels like weve got a closer relationship. Everyone would write their own stuff for doing sprites, for doing scrolling in the background.

The only bit of shared software I ever used was a music player, which was used by the whole company. So there's probably more sharing outside of Rare, with other studios, than there ever used to be within.

So it's a different way we work now, RG: What do you see as the key advantages and disadvantages to being a first-party developer?

GM: The obvious advantage is focus. It's like learning any new skill. If you learn three skills you can only devote a certain amount of time to each; if you're only learning one then you can put all of your time into it.

GA: There was talk before as well that when the Microsoft deai was going through there were a few other interested parties, which I'm not sure is properly documented anywhere.

But there was an opportunity there to almost go multiformat. Migrating between the GameCube, Xbox and finally the Xbox , it was one of the longest development processes fora game at Rare.

Its notable for its staggering visuals and a shape-shifting heroine, Kameo, who could morph into plants, elemental warriors and animats.

The game since spawned a sequel, a party game spin-off and a great mini adaptation for the Oh, and lest we forget an animated television series that we've never watched.

All are proudly showcased here. Driving not only cars, hut also aeroplanes and hovercraft, as well as featurir a fun adventure mode, made it, in my opinion, way better than the over-hyped Mario Kart Great controls, g real characters, great levels and a great soundtrack.

It's great. ISIS: The thing, as well with being tied to, let's not just say one publisher but one platform holder, is that you get a chance to implement and shape that platform as well.

Certainly looking more to now, Avatars have fundamentally changed a lot of people's perceptions of the Xbox and the [New Xbox Experience], and they were developed here.

If we weren't part of the platform holder, we wouldn't be able to do that. BG: With Kinect obviously we had to be involved straight from the start, before any third-party publisher could get even a sniff of it.

And it's been a fantastic experience to do something completely new, SMB; But also scary at the same time.

You think back: there were the three of us flying back after we'd first seen it, going, 'How the heil are we going to make games with this?

There's not even any buttons! If you weren't part of the platform you couldn't do that, RG: How much autonomy do you really have as a first-party developer?

GA; You've got a degree of autonomy but you have to understand that the industry has changed fundamentally from what it was ten years ago.

Back then, we could have got together, come up with a whole bunch of concepts and just started working on those games.

Then go to Nintendo six months down the line, show them a prototype of what we've put together and they'd say, J Okay great, we can do something with that.

The amount of people you have to get involved to develop anything is ridiculous to what it was like. Now you have 30 to 40 programmers working on one game.

There's big money involved in the industry, and I think that when that happens, in any industry, you've got to start falling into line a little bit These companies become risk-averse.

They don't want to be investing too many millions on gambles, so the industry has changed quite fundamentally, RG: How different is it to try to create new franchises today than, say, ten years ago?

G Again, it's different. To create a new franchise today from the ground up is very difficult. You're competing with all the established IPs and licensed products, so it's a very different world to be in.

Ten years ago it would have been a little bit easier to throw a bear and a bird together and create something for Nintendo, and to do the same thing today is more difficult.

Tastes have changed; the way people play games has changed. It's a very different space, BG: It's down to sheer speed, I think, We used to be able to have six games on the go at once and be knocking out each game within a year.

So, if you throw enough stuff out there, some of it's going to stick and you've got a chance of finding a really strong success, R Can we expect to see a return from you to traditional controller-based games, or is Rare's focus now solely on Kinect?

GA: For the foreseeable future Kinect is the road that we're on. That doesn't necessarily mean that is the road weTe going to stay on, but that's where we're heading for the next year.

IMS: I suppose really what we've found is there is so much cool stuff we could do, and we've kind of scratched the surface with Kinect Sports and it would be such a shame to leave it now.

GA And it's highly dependent on how successful the launch is and how well the games do. There are good vibes that it's going to be good, so the future looks rosy but we'll just have to wait ana' see.

F: How has Microsoft changed Rare? GA: I think they've definitely taught us to be more mindful of the market over the last handful of years.

We always created games for ourselves a lot of the time. And that's great. You had a lot of passion behind those games.

They were very unique, they were very unusual, they had a market at the time on the N64, and to some degree on the as well, but 1 think making games nowadays is certainly about trying to look at a specific audience.

The market has become so much bigger than what it used to be. You've got families playing games, you've got kids at eight years of age playing games, you've got pensioners playing games, so the market has become so much bigger, and it's taught us that we do need to be more specific when we target the audience that we're going to make a game for.

But we still retain the essence of what Rare is all about. We love working on new technology, we love working on new things, I guess it's taught us to be more mindful of the market, more diligent in terms of production, and to try to get games finished to a better time scale, but hasn't kind of diminished our ability to be creative, RG: Finally, what, in your opinion, defines a Rare game?

GA: There's definitely a sense of humour, definitely a sense of technical prowess. Visually, I think we've always been there or thereabouts.

GIVI: It's the attention to detail as well. You never really feel the job is done. You never quite feel like you've done enough so you keep chasing and chasing.

GM: Some people will never see some of the content in our games because it's not like you play through it once and see the whole lot.

It's like a good film, where you'll watch it again and you'll notice different things. And that's the attention to detail where we've gone that extra mile on something.

Rare revisited the Stampers' fi rst eve r ga m e. With over 10 0 levels, new high-definition graphics, online leaderboards.

Achievements to unlock, and an on and offline co-op multiplayer mode, Jetpoc Refuelled proved a great update of the original Spectrum classic. Format; Instrumental in shaping the New Xbox Experience for Microsoft, Rare was responsible for Avaiars, allowing users t o create virtual ve rsio ns of themselves in the Dashboard for use in certain games.

Coming shortly after 4J's Bonjo-Kozooie re-release, both update s we re notable f or f i nally making use of the 'Stop 'N' Swop' feature, dropped on the N64 that had riddled so many.

Not only is Christmas a time that most developers release their big-hitters, but following all of the present unwrapping, tree dressing and present returning, most people are soon left wanting to forget the festivities the instant they return to the office One of the most famous, sought-after, and fast examples of this now-dead game genre is Daze Before Christmas.

Released only in Australia for some reason I can only assume they like Christmas more than all the other countries it has become pretty sought- after with collectors, as few copies of the game wore released.

Primarily a side-sc rolling platform game, Daze focused on Santa's fictional plight to rescue ail his elfin employees and reindeer from art evil band of tenuous Xmas-themed bosses.

So far, so Christmas, right? Well, the game gets a little more bizarre in parts, and this is mainly through the inclusion of Santa having weird Merlin-meets- Doctor-JekyII powers.

His main method of attack is a fornn of magic dust that turns his enemies into presents, Also, if his lips touch even a drop of coffee, which takes the form of power-ups in the game, he transforms in his demonic alter-ego: Anti-Claus.

In this form, he is momentarily invincible and attacks by belting his enemies over the face with his sack of gifts. Daze certainly isn't the greatest platformer, but it's better than it probably has any right to be.

The levels are varied, the visuals colourful and the animation slick Is it worth the tall asking prico? Granted, a mint copy of Radiant Sifvergun is going to cost you a small fortune, but there are plenty of other worthy titles that can be picked up for less than a fiver,,, D uring the s and early s, mag writers had a real love-hate relationship with Dizzy.

In Seymour Goes to Hollywood , the new hero suddenly found that his stab at fame was being hindered by the fact the scripts were locked in a safe and the keys had gone missing.

So with everyone else seemingly too lazy to go look for them and in the sheer absence of runners, it was up to Seymour himself to go and find them.

Big Red had worked on Magic land Dizzy you see, and so it knew what made a good Dizzy game and that, in effect, was what Seymour was.

The idea was to set off the other way - it proved massively frustrating and something that could so easily have killed the game for many people. Those who figured it out, though, were richly rewarded with a screen game that had plenty of little asides, quirks and even Tarzan.

Despite the similarities between Seymour and Dizzy it was sufficiently different to justify being a new series.

The tendency for Dizzy to get himself into trouble was replaced with a character who was let down by others and had to sort out the issues someone else had created.

It's subtle, but it does tend to resonate with the real world a bit more. Seymour helped to prop up the likes of the CPC, C64 and Spectrum when most software houses were leaving.

In doing so, he provided a cool romp that really must be played. Small things please small creatures, it seems n [Amstrad Tree action in a scene reminiscent of a Dizzy game.

For a brief moment in , however, Crammond dispensed with the realism and instead decided for one glorious game to answer the following question: What would happen if someone decided to merge drag racing and rollercoasters?

The result is one of the greatest racing videogames of all time, tasking you with flinging your rugged racing car around eight perilous circuits, aiming to avoid killing yourself in the process.

In lower punch, Hot Rod looks also-rans. On the plus racing or so it would adversary in Division 3.

Wheelies slow you divisions, fa II off the dashing, but he races side, the game at least seem ; Road Hog's easy Overtake him on a bend, down, but don't seem to track and you'll lose; like a man possessed.

Leap over him or you need to avoid any swerve and overtake on Mr Anonymous. By contrast, Stunt Car Racer is unashamedly an arcade game.

It's meant to be fun r and it feels great as you hurl your car round tracks, into corners, and use boost to scream away from opponents.

The absurd track design of course adds to the brilliance, providing a unique and exhilarating racing experience.

Clue: it's not the computer Stunt Car Racer has a pretty good go at injecting a little personality into the various rivals you face.

There are clear differences between the ways the characters behave, and the difficulty curve is reasonable throughout, with drivers in the higher divisions proving much tougher to beat.

However, the computer A! Luckily, you can link two Amigas together and play head-to-head although each player needs their own Amiga and their own television or monitor.

Acute racing game Crammond is a devious sort when it comes to track design, and even some of Stunt Car Racer's easier tracks have nasty surprises lurking try careening round The Hump Back and you'll likely smack into the final comer, for example.

Many of the most challenging course components are demanding jumps that force you to be at full speed before launching your car into the air, but our favourite sneaky moment occurs at the end of The High Jump.

Immediately after one of the last corners, a straight runs at a degree angle, which frequently catches us out, It's a rollercoaster The Hump Back's undulating track is glorious; The Little Ramp's simplicity is great for speed runs; The Ski Jump is thrilling; The Draw Bridge including an actual drawbridge that raises and lowers is totally bonkers.

For us, though, nothing beats Division 2 track The Roller Coaster, The circuit is, believe it or not, laid out like a rollercoaster, and bar a first corner that you must take slowly or you fly right off the track , it's mostly a hell-for-leather circuit that finds you giddily belting down perilous slopes and then boosting up massive inclines.

Damage limitation Damage modelling is a contentious area of modern racers: too realistic and gamers get frustrated while sponsors moan that 'their' cars are getting ruined on-screen; avoid it entirely and risk- and-reward becomes absent.

Stunt Car Racer matches its arcade sensibilities with a straightforward yet brilliant car-damage mechanic. Rough landings and collisions result in 'chassis crack' progressing from left to right.

Dreadful landings punch holes in the chassis, speeding up the crack's progress, and holes are only repaired at the season's end. An amazing game, almost perfect in fact.

A must buy r for all Amiga owners. Action all the way - you really will be holding your breath as you go flying over the jumps and gritting your teeth with determination when you see your opponent go whizzing past.

All it lacks is an instant replay option to allow an out-of-cockpit view of those spectacular crashes. However, retail marketing wasn't really where he wanted to be, and as a new year dawned he started looking at the exciting new frontier of home computers and videogames.

Everybody else was - why shouldn't I? What now? Alexander started Virgin Games in early r on his own and with very little idea of what to do next.

Kensington High Street. As the Virgtn empire j grew, it became impossible j for entire companies to join in, j so participation became more i fragmented.

One year, some f Virgin Games employees got j to spend a long weekend away j with Richard Branson m Jersey, ; enjoying rides in the Virgin hot air j : oalloon.

The j product sold around a hundred [ copies. Commodore CDTV m After a few weeks of solitude, he began recruiting additional staff.

Virgin attracted submissions by issuing a press release announcing that the company was looking for titles to publish. Chris Sievey - who sadly died earlier this year aged just 54 : - wrote The Biz for Virgin Games, j : which was a pop music strategy ; game on the Spectrum.

As Frank, Chris appeared in j TV and radio shows, and the i character also toured as a stand- i up comedian in the late Eighties j end early Nineties.

He also came up with the idea of a Virgin Games tour: "We bought a double-decker bus [the former Southampton J P decorated it in black and white stripes with the Laughing Shark on the side, kitted it out with computers, and then took it round the country to shopping centres and schools, and that generated a lot of publicity.

However, just as Virgin Games was making progress, the industry threw a serious wobble. With a low El. What he did know was that they would have to up their game if Virgin was to survive in what had become a very cut-throat market, so new staff were recruited, including technical manager Steve Webb, as well as commercial director Jeremy Cook and Patricia Mitchell, who were both former colleagues of Alexander's from his Thorn EMI days.

She also started writing the instructions and copy that appeared on the cassette inlays. A new policy of releasing fewer games but of a much higher quality than before 5?

Strangeloop by Charles Goodwin and Sorcery on the Spectrum by Martin Wheeler were certainly vast improvements on previous Virgin releases.

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